Our work in Kenya

 

Sense International is working in Kenya to identify children with deafblindness and other complex disabilities and ensure that they receive a quality education and the skills to start a business.

In Kenya, an estimated 1 million people live with a mild form of deafblindness and over 100,000 people live with a severe form of deafblindness.*

Limited health infrastructure to identify children with sensory impairments means that they do not receive vital support from an early age that would help them to thrive. Research has also found that children with disabilities in Kenya are more likely to be out of school than children without disabilities.** The impact lasts a child’s lifetime.

Our work addresses the needs of children with deafblindness and other complex disabilities from birth. We are working to identify young children with sensory impairments as early as possible through a sight and hearing screening process. In partnership with local health services, we ensure that infants with sensory impairments receive treatment and are able to access therapies that will improve their future outcomes.

We are supporting children with deafblindness and other complex disabilities to receive an education at home or in school. By training Learning Support Assistants, and helping teachers and parents to develop the knowledge and skills to meet the learning needs of children with deafblindness and other complex disabilities, we are breaking down the barriers to a quality education.

We are giving young people with deafblindness and other complex disabilities the opportunity to learn a trade. We are helping Vocational Education and Training Centres to become more inclusive, ensuring that courses are tailored to the needs of students with deafblindness and other complex disabilities, and offer the chance to learn relevant skills.

In all of our work, we collaborate closely with local authorities and national government in Kenya. This ensures that positive changes for children with deafblindness and other complex disabilities are sustained over time and upheld by law.

Inclusive education

Inclusive education

100 children

with deafblindness and complex disabilities were supported to receive an education in mainstream schools last year

Learning at home

Learning at home

163 children

with deafblindness and complex disabilities are following a curriculum at home in preparation for a school-based education

 

* Figures based on prevalence estimates produced as part of research by the World Federation of the Deafblind (WFDB). This data may differ from official government statistics.
World Federation of the Deafblind (WFDB), 2018 At risk of exclusion from CRPD and SDGs implementation: Inequality and persons with deafblindness.

** Voluntary Service Overseas, 2016 Kenya National Special Needs Education Survey Report